Woman shot dead in protest against Myanmar coup: family

Relatives said the woman died of a bullet in the head during a demonstration against a military in Myanmar.

The February 9 shooting of Maia Thwet Thwet Khine was captured in video on 20 February as she protested the removal of Myanmar’s elected leader Aung San Kyi in Nyepita, the capital of the Southeast Asian country.

Khan was seen falling to the ground after being shot, wearing a helmet on a motorcycle as protesters pelted stones at police who sprayed water on the crowd before firing live rounds.

A doctor in a hospital in Naypyitaw Told Human Rights Watch After the shooting that Khine had lost significant brain function and was listed in critical condition. Her family told the Associated Press that she died on Friday – the first confirmation of thousands of people who allegedly opposed the military takeover.

“Please participate and keep fighting until we have achieved our goal,” he told the Associated Press.

Khine’s funeral will be held on Sunday, his sister said.

MYA THWATE / AFP via Getty Image
The death of Maya Thwett Thwet Khine further agitated the protesters, who have so far held non-violent demonstrations.
MYA THWATE / AFP family support via Getty Images

in The statement was released in the early hours of Friday, Human Rights Watch officials said that the Naypitaw police have blood in their hands and the officer who shot Khine could be held accountable.

HRW deputy director Phil Robertson said, “Everyone watched the video while walking away from the police line, empty hands and looking at her sister standing next to her sister and then hearing her voice.” . “This police killing is abusive and unacceptable; there are no other words for it.”

Accusing the officer who shot Robert “is the only appropriate way to honor the memory of this brave young woman”, Robertson said.

Mya Thoe Thwe Khine's sister, Mya Thatoe New, talks to members of the media in Naypyitaw, Myanmar.
Mya Thoe Thwe Khine’s sister, Mya Thatoe New, talks to members of the media in Naypyitaw, Myanmar.
EPA / MAUNG

President Joe Biden announced last week that he was slapping sanctions against Myanmar, also known as Burma.

A day later, the Biden administration nominated top military commander Min Aung Helling and his deputy Soo Win, as well as four members of the state administration council, as the target of an executive order to let the generals raise more than $ 1 billion in government. To prevent from using. Money held in the United States.

“Today’s approval should not be permanent,” the White House said in a February 11 statement. “Burma’s military must immediately restore power to a democratically elected government, end the state of emergency, leave all of them in unjust detention, and ensure that peaceful protesters are not met with violence. “

Flowers are being laid during prayers for Maiya Thawe Thwa Khine.
Flowers are being laid during prayers for Maiya Thawe Thwa Khine.
EPA / LYNN BO BO

Demonstrations are continuing on Friday in Myanmar’s largest city of Yangon and elsewhere in the country. Khine’s death further agitated the protesters, who have so far held non-violent demonstrations.

With post wires

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