Kevin Mather’s rant exposed the MLB’s service time manipulation case

TAMPA – Prospects support the possibility that, by Sunday, you may have never heard of Kevin Mather.

Now it is wondered if the man simply saved baseball.

Okay, there’s a guilty plea to hyperbole and not even the first offense. But whether Mather, who resigned from the presidency of the Mariner on Monday, created a new future in the wake of several recent horrendous comments in the midst of unceremoniously rapid discussions in public between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association. Tried. sport?

Because thanks to Mather, service-time manipulation, a pox on the game, does not exist. In a virtual discussion with the Bellevue Breakfast Rotary Club this month, Mather stated the quiet part aloud several times, confirming how the Mariners prioritized the Ortius process in roster management. In terms of competitive sports, what is more aggressive, compared to a system that encourages teams to keep their best players off the field of play for payroll management purposes? For example, did the Mets turn into heroes, as they opened the 2019 season with Pete Alonso in their team?

Speaking of the objectionable, you can easily assume that Mather’s service-time- commentaries have a great deal of commentary at least to those associated with his jaw. His racist retired Japanese pitcher Hisashi Iwakuma (who has returned to the club as a special-assignment coach) and Dominican prospect Julio Rodriguez single-handedly formed the basis for the dismissal and an impressive, untiring campaign to diversify the game Continued, who were carrying the baton. From fellow white-men — badly Jared Porter and Mikki Callaway — and taking it up the corporate ladder. Mather took a few shots in the face of franchise Kyle Seeger for no good reason and took out some other nonsense about various people and issues.

Kevin mather
Kevin mather
AP

Baseball, and the rest of the world, must keep it to conquer bigotry and general ignorance; History leads the slogan of this battle to victory. A baseball-specific issue of service-time manipulation, however, to allow players in the minor leagues to gain an extra year of control or provide them with a reduced year of arbitration eligibility, is something that is soon after the current expiration The collective bargaining agreement may disappear on 1 December.

Mather spoke of his club’s top prospect Jared Kellnick, the No. 6 overall draft pick of 2018, whom Mets fans eagerly awaited after seeing that his team saw him as part of the package of Robinson Cano and Edwin Diaz in Seattle Dealt with as. The M offered Kellenick a long-term contract, Mather divorced, which ruled him out of his arbitration years and gave the club a chance to control him (through team options) through 2029. Kelnik said that, as stated by the website Lookout landing, And lo and behold, “We would like to get him some more batsmen in the minor leagues. Maybe [Triple-A] for a month, and then he will likely be in left field at T-Mobile Park for the next six or seven years. “

If Kellenic had agreed to the extension, he would obviously start in 2021 in the big leagues.

There was no need to connect the dots with another Mather statement, as he saw last season: “If our major league team had COVID outbreaks, or injuries, and we had to call people from the taxi squad, We were very short on one player. Because there was no chance to see these young players in T-Mobile Park. We couldn’t put him on the 40-man roster. We were not going to start the service time clock. “

Ground for a complaint, anyone? The Players’ Association has not surprisingly made a statement, with Mather’s comments being “a highly disturbing critical window into the players the management sees.”

To be fair, such views are not universal; The Pads promoted Fernando Tatis Jr. for the 2019 Opening Day just as the Mets did to Alonso. Still, they are prominent, and veteran Anthony Rizzo as the Cubs told reporters on Monday, “I’m glad it’s in public now.”

The mission calls for the issue to be completely removed from there. It is up to baseball leaders to fix this headache, so that nothing else, the next dumb executive has one less trap.

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